‘No user lost and no archive left behind’

This year, we’re engaging with the archive sector, key stakeholders and partners from the cultural, creative and digital sectors to co-create a new strategic vision for archives.

Since our roundtable in Wiltshire, we have held three further roundtable sessions – here at The National Archives in Kew, in Birmingham and in Manchester

We are making a call to complete an online survey which will be live until early September. Also, on Monday 15 August between 13:00-14:00, I’ll be taking part in a Twitter Q&A to hear what you think about the future of archives, along with our Research and Collections Director Dr Val Johnson. I would love to hear from you – use the #ArchiveVision hashtag to join the conversation.

Image of 8 people sat discussing the future of archives

Future Vision for Archives roundtable, The National Archives, 25 July 2016

Thank you to all of the delegates who attended our roundtable discussions last month and also to those of you who have already completed the online survey.

This is our opportunity to co-create the future vision for the archive sector. We will announce a wider consultation on the vision at the Discovering Collections, Discovering Communities conference in October.

In the meantime I want to share with you something which was said by a university archivist delegate which in my opinion really captures what the future is about. She said ‘No user lost and no archive left behind’.

Details on future engagement opportunities will be sent out via our regular communications channels such as the enewsletter, jiscmail, and partners’ updates so keep engaging with us: ArchivePolicy@nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk.

2 comments

  1. […] techadmin on August 11, 2016 ‘No user lost and no archive left behind’2016-08-11T13:55:13+00:00 – Journals & Publications – No […]

  2. David Matthew says:

    I find this rather depressing as researchers have already complained (rightly) to TNA that we are not involved or asked by TNA and what we will have is a system which neither fits nor is wanted by researchers.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

We will not be able to respond to personal family history research questions on the blog.
See our moderation policy for more details.