Explore Your Archive is back!

Explore Your Archive made a momentous return this weekend, appealing to members of the archive sector and public alike to delve deep into their local collections.

As part of the fourth annual Explore Your Archive week, the organisations and people who look after archive collections will be taking to Twitter – and we want you to join us! Find out what a typical day in an archive is like, discover the collections, post your pictures and tell us why you love archives. Each day we will have a different hashtag, so you can join in and connect with archives globally.

Today’s theme is a celebration of pioneers and historical firsts from within archive collections, firsts from archives and groundbreaking projects within archives – #archivepioneers.

Explore Your Archive

Without archives we could not study our personal histories or the histories of our communities or nations. There would be no historically rich novels and films. We would know nothing about the lives of our predecessors. We would not be able to revisit controversial political decisions or compelling legal cases.

Through the Explore Your Archive campaign we are inviting you to explore the treasures in archives around you, and want to make this year better than ever! Archives are where the records of your life, your community, your business, your nation and your world are collected, kept safe and made accessible. We all benefit from archives – often without realising: we want more people to understand and value their richness and diversity. There are so many kinds of archives: in local authorities and governments, in businesses, in schools and universities, in charities, in private houses, in cultural and religious organisations… All playing their part in keeping our collective memory safe and accessible for future generations.

Explore Your Archive. There is so much to discover.

1 comments

  1. Dominik Bíly says:

    Hi everybody… Make me happy and please speak me about this more.

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